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January 2011

The model or the pedestal? Which is the more effective image?

Photographing jewelry, sculpture or clothing intended to be worn on the body presents specific challenges. The biggest question is what is the most effective  photographic image-- a model or a more "neutral" background without the figure? This is one of the topics to be discussed at the Professional Development Seminar.

MannequinSchick
Spring Green Necklace
Painted papeier mache
© 1993 Marjorie Schick
Photo Credit: Gary Pollmiller

Using a mannequin can be a striking solution, midway between a live model and an isolated object. This photo (left) of work by Marjorie Schick uses a mannequin that is stylistically consistent with the work. It works perfectly!

Don't confuse this dramatic solution with a headless muslin sewing mannequin that was "found" at a flea market. It is NOT the same thing.

On the other hand, a live model is sometimes the only solution to bring out the best for your work, but a model in the photo adds multiple levels of complexity.

Modrelease2010_Page_2

If using a live model, begin with the Model Release Contract from the Professional Guidelines. At least this contract lets you be comfortable knowing that your model is allowing you to use their image in your photos.

Boris Bally necklace on model
  Scrap Leaves: B Wear Necklace
  
© 2005 Boris Bally
  Constructed  from street signs.
  Artist: Boris Bally
  Photo Credit: Aaron UsherIII

 

Next decision, use a model consistent with the type of work. The appearance of your model has a HUGE IMPACT on the artwork being photographed.  Boris Bally's work on the right made from street signs finds context with a model right out of the urban environment.  If a professional model is outside your budget, use a dancer, athlete or yoga participant. Their body positions are often more graceful.

IMG_5965.72
  Photo shoot
  emiko oye photographer

Lighting is KEY to great photos. Bounce cards with natural lighting is the easiest way for amateur photographers to get better "fill light" with or without a model.

Photoshootbouncecards

 

Bounce cards can be plain white foam core, a mirror or aluminum foil over cardboard. You can also buy professional level photography umbrellas, etc. but the "homemade suggestions" work just fine.

At the shoot with a live model, be prepared. You need at least one or two extra people to hold bounce cards when you try to capture the right moment of sunshine.

Recycledstraight72 For example, the photos in this post were from a recent "home grown" photo shoot.

I must confess that I've learned a lot about shooting models from watching America's Top Model. Laugh at me all you want, but if you need to use models to photograph your work, then watch this show for helpful insights. (Cycle 16 premieres Wednesday, Feb. 23!) Listen to the experts critique the photos, learn from their voices of experience. While fashion photography is not the same as photographing art and craft, there are many tips you can carry back to your own photography.

Recycled2or When using models, be prepared for a long photo shoot. Working with models always seems to take at least twice as long as you plan. Hair, make-up, clothing, lighting are all a significant factor. Adding the problems involved in the way the jewelry, clothing or art actually fits (or doesn't fit) on the model, is a very complex puzzle.

Recycled2OrBRarm 

What do you think? The model or the pedestal?

The next post will be about the problem with hands in a photo shoot. Don't shoot yourself in the foot, or should I say hand. Do you know how to get great hand model photos?

Harriete 

Recycle Plastic Bracelets shown above by Harriete Estel Berman constructed from post consumer recycled plastic. Photos by emiko oye

51yuPuUf-bL._SL160_ Looking for a beautiful book with amazing images of the manequin and the model. Marjorie Schick's book about her art to wear offers 100's of images that might inspire your next photo shoot.

 


Professional Guidelines improve your images!

Sunday I posted opportunities to submit your images for three different books. Check it out if you missed the post. I didn't want to wait until Tuesday because of the pending deadline for submitting images.

BentClocks06 "Oh No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!," you say.
"My images aren't ready!!!!!!!!!"
"My new work isn't finished!!!!!!!!!!!"

That is just the point! Success is always just around the corner, but only if you are prepared with photographs. You can't wait until the opportunity is upon you to make something you've been thinking about for years. Don't wait for an invitation to complete that important project. Then get your photos done.  Chance favors the prepared!

Alysso Endo PHOTO shoot of aqua bracelet behind the camera
Photo shoot in progress. Photo Credit: Alyssa Endo

The Professional Guidelines has several documents that will help you on your path to success with  four topics to improve your application:

TOP TEN TIPS for Getting into a Juried Exhibition, Show, Book or Magazine. 

Working with Digital Images Effectively

GUIDE TO Professional Quality Images

Model Release Contract


All information is FREE.

Click on this link Download PGHANDOUT2010 for a one page PDF including all 19 topics in the Professional Guidelines.

Stay tuned for the next post about using a model to photograph your jewelry, clothing or art to wear.


New Opportunities to Submit Your Photos - Follow This to Improve Your Chances of Success

There are opportunities to submit your work to upcoming books -- right now, but first below are some tips and links to help improve your chances. 

Consider reading the previous posts on ASK Harriete about photographic backgrounds.  The series isn't finished but I didn't want to wait any longer to let you know about these opportunities to use your fabulous photos!
Professional-Guidelines-Larger-Image
NEXT, MORE TIPS can be found in the Professional Guidelines which include three specific topics to improve your application:

TOP TEN TIPS for Getting into a Juried Exhibition, Show, Book or Magazine. 

Working with Digital Images Effectively

GUIDE TO Professional Quality Images

And finally, when submitting for a publication, this is NOT the time to experiment with unusual colored or textured backgrounds.  To avoid getting a "NOT ACCEPTED" notice, stick with the conventional white, black or graduated backgrounds. These "tried and true" standards reliably produce more "acceptable" images for a wide range of situations.

Now, here are BOOKS SEEKING ENTRIES.
(Click on the links provided for more information.)

1) Humor in Craft ,Schiffer Publishing ,curated by Brigitte Martin

2) 500 Rings ,Lark Books, curated by Bruce Metcalf

3) The Bead and Wire Jewellery Designer’s Bible, Download Information Pack (BDEA) UK by Renata Graham Note: The deadline is very tight, January 31st, so send samples of your work ASAP if you are interested! Preferably only new work. The information is not clear about what size photos so I recommend 4" x 6" x 300 dpi.



Update:
Humor in Craft was published and has won multiple book publishing awards. If you are interested in craft objects from sculpture to jewelry I highly recommend this book for hours, days and weeks of entertainment and interesting observations.

HumorINCraft

The Bead and Wire Jewellery Designer’s Bible, by Renata Graham

In summer 2011 quarto Publishing will be delivering this forthcoming title world wide, and we are currently looking for a wide selection of bead jewellery and beadwork to feature throughout the book.

Each featured artist will be credited in full and receive a complimentary copy.

Please see attached for further details.

Note the deadline is very tight, 31st Jan, so send me samples of your work asap if you are interested! Preferably only new work.

Watermarks on photos - Not Good, The Bad and The UGLY

Marie Kazalia abstract plaid1lrg
      Abstract Plaid #1
     © 2010 Marie Kazalia
     Artist Oil, Alkyd Paints on Canvas

What do you think of digital watermarks and such? I cringe when I see them.
Maria Kazalia

Maria,

This is a good point to bring up during this photography series on ASK Harriete.  When you say digital watermarks, I want to focus on the watermarks on images of art or craft Manpainting-- not about the digital watermarks on STOCK PHOTOS intended to drive purchase of the photo (like the left image). 

I wrote about watermarks once before, but I wanted to bring this up again and be very clear. Putting a watermark, icon, signature on top of, over, near, or in the corner of photographic images of art or craft is a huge mistake. Don't do it.

Watermark When I see a watermark on a photo, I refuse to try to look through it or past it.  The photo is ruined.  Instead, I move on.  And I believe most people react similarly.

That's my opinion.  Now here is a more rational consideration. 

The greatest value of posting images online is to get more visibility. All of the many possible venues (whether on Facebook, Crafthaus, Flickr, or your own website) help to expose your images to a larger audience.  The Internet is based on the exchange of ideas and images, yours included!  Based on the concept of the Long tail, the Internet is a fabulous opportunity to enable a widely dispersed audience to find, appreciate, and share your work.

Goof Off Flower Pin by Harriete Estel Berman
Goof Off/Goof Up Flower Pin
 © 2011 Harriete Estel Berman
Recycled tin cans, screws.

A watermark on a photographic image discourages any blog, web site, writer, or online marketplace from copying and sharing your images. Watermarks disfigure the images. It is akin to putting the images in a virtual closet with the door shut!

 

HAND PICK  Flower Pin by Harriete Estel Berman
Hand Pick Flower Pin
© 2011Harriete Estel Berman
Recycled tin cans, screw,

If the purpose for a watermark on your photos is to  "protect" them from being stolen or copied, then the Internet is the wrong place for your images.  This is the wrong approach to protect your work.

 

 

There are many more effective options for protecting your work:

  • Create a unique unmistakable signature style; 
  • Develop a technique that is not used by other artists or makers;
  • Pursue recognizable subject matter that establishes your reputation;
  • Pursue unique content issues;
  • Continue developing your techniques and style so that impostors are always behind you.
  • Create a strong identity for your name and your work (then impostors will be seen as just that, impostors). If a person wants to buy a Zac Posen dress, they will buy Zac Posen. If a person wants a Harriete Estel Berman, they will buy a Harriete Estel Berman. Copycats are "also rans."

Other options for protecting your work are: 

  • Post smaller images (e.g. 200px x 200px x 72dpi). This is not recommended, but it is a better alternative than a watermark on your images. 
  • Use FLASH for your images. FLASH images are more difficult to copy. This is not recommended either. Flash can not be rendered by most phones, or I-PAD type technology. Thus your web site is not viewable online by the new mobile technologies. (A future post will provide more information on this issue.)

OK you got it! Watermarks on photos are OUT!

Fantastic  Flower Pin by Harriete Estel Berman is constructed from recycled materials.
  Fantastic Flower Pin
  © 2011Harriete Estel Berman
  Recycled tin cans, screw,

QUALITY PHOTOS are your secret to success.~ Your photographic images can travel at the speed of light, work 24 hours a day, shrink to the size of a stamp, and expand to super viewing size.  

 

 

Another point of view on watermarks in a post titled "Should You Watermark Art You Are Posting Online" by Jason Horejs.


Related Post to the watermark issue is when museums post your images on their website, use your images for catalogs, calendars or loaning your artwork to other institutions. In theses examples they would not want a watermarked image. Read about how they handle copyright and images in the post Copyright and a Non-Exclusive License.

 

Previous posts in the series Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos:

Breaking the "Rules" with Style AND Perfection - Photos that work!

Side by Side Comparisons - the White Background, Can You Cut It?

Side by Side Photos - Website Backgrounds Should be Consistent

Side by Side Photos -Clean or Complex Backgrounds?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons - Backgrounds with Texture or Pattern?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons: Colorful or Discordant?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos: Black Hole or Super Sophisticated?

Side by side comparisons of different photos - the graduated background. Stunning or stupefying?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos - the white background. Trendy or Technique?

Are You Being Judged by the Style of Your Images?


The photographers are revealed!


Breaking the "Rules" with Style AND Perfection - Photos that work!

Recently, post after post on ASK Harriete has talked about the attributes of quality photographs to help artists and makers develop more effective photos to represent their work.  The "rules, standards, or conventions" are there because they reliably produce acceptably images for a wide range of situations.  Well, there are also exceptions!  I recently ran across a photograph that breaks some major rules, and it's fantastic!

The photo and artwork to the right below is from Krystal Speck.

KrystalSpeck
Work by Krystal Speck at Chicago's
One of a Kind Show

Why does this image work so well? How can this artist break such fundamental rules so successfully? The answer is that it perfectly combines both personal style and accuracy.

  • The exposure of the photograph is perfect.
  • Focus is precise,
  • Colors clear.
  • The ceramic has a slight reflection to indicate a smooth surface but it doesn't wash out the work,
  • The standard graduated background balances the applied graphics,
  • The irreverent flower drawings parallel and reinforce details within the photo,
  • Overall, a very personal style that is memorable but doesn't obscure the work.

Rickson on Crafthaus commented about this photo saying, "I love the image as it shows the whole creative process from inspiration, to drawings to finished product." The graphics are not extraneous.  They add meaning in her photos because they offer insight into the decorative elements in her work.

KrystalSpeckwebsiteNow taking a look at the website for Krystal Speck, the graphics in her photos also match the web site styling perfectly. Krystal Speck establishes an identity with each photo that she carries forward into her web site. A recurring graphic (left above) is the header for every page.  A consistent header or style on every page of a web site helps develop a clear identity within the web site.

Krystal also has the more standard photos to represent her work (right below). Again the photo quality is superb. The graphics on these ceramic items match the web site graphics. This complete approach to every detail of her work and web site defines a very high level of professionalism.    KrystalSpeck2

Yet, some conventions remain reliable.  The standard graduated background photos demonstrate that she is ready with her jury submission photos.

[The one criticism that I would raise about her web site is that there is no information about the work. Even when you click on the images, there is no descriptive text. I hope she adds this information soon.]

In the meantime, I hope this exceptional example offers insight into how breaking the photographic rules with style and perfection can really set you apart from the crowd.

Harriete

The 2011  Professional Development Seminar in Seattle with three noted photographers, and editors Marthe Le Van, Lark Books, and Suzanne Ramljak, Metalsmith Magazine discussed trends in photographing craft objects. Listen to their commentary in a series of SlideShare presentations.
Previous posts in the series Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos:

Side by Side Comparisons - the White Background, Can You Cut It?

Side by Side Photos - Website Backgrounds Should be Consistent

Side by Side Photos -Clean or Complex Backgrounds?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons - Backgrounds with Texture or Pattern?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons: Colorful or Discordant?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos: Black Hole or Super Sophisticated?

Side by side comparisons of different photos - the graduated background. Stunning or stupefying?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos - the white background. Trendy or Technique?

Are You Being Judged by the Style of Your Images?


The photographers are revealed!


Side by Side Comparisons - the White Background, Can You Cut It?

A white background in a photographic image has some very practical advantages. The pure white background (#000000) works very well to embed the photo across a variety of other media such as text documents, line sheets, combining images in print or creating a cohesive presentation on a web site. Here are examples in the illustrations below:

White IRREGULAR text The white background in a photo image allows text to move around the image eliminating the grid format. Using In Design or Illustrator the text can be placed around the image in an interesting format. It allows a little more creativity and interest in the layout of the page as in the example to the left from Departures Magazine.

With this idea, you can create great Artist Statements. To see an example of one of my Artist Statements with a embedded images, here is a PDF version to download.  Download Historicalteapotscoffeepots.
Historicalteapotscoffeepots_Page_1 Historicalteapotscoffeepots_Page_2

Line-Sheet-05 On a similar level, the white background allows artists and makers to create attractive line sheets with a clean professional layout. (Learn more about a line sheet in a future post, but essentially this is a list of your "line" or the production items that you sell.)

The white photographic background also provides a consistent look in groups of photos on web sites, juried applications, and on the printed page.

An example of a beautiful web site with images on white backgrounds is photographer Steven Brian Samuels.  A diverse group of works blends well into a cohesive, dramatic and up to date presentation.

51ccD8DhZXL._SL160_
Adorn © 2008
Book by Amanda Mansell
Artist:
Photo Credit: Philip Cohen

The white background has been used very effectively in the jewelry book Adorn. If you enjoy looking through a  beautiful book, this is perhaps one of my favorites in part because of the immaculate white background layout.

AdornP151
Adorn © 2008
Book by Amanda Mansell

Page 151
Artwork by Harriete Estel Berman

All of the jewelry in the book is on a white background. It makes the images (from a wide variety of makers) look incredibly cohesive. There is NO patchwork of the photographic background grid since all the backgrounds are removed.

In this book, I know all the work didn't arrive at the author or publisher with white backgrounds. Many of the images were cut from their photographic backgrounds (including mine) to create this very attractive layout.

ADORNP85
Adorn © 2008
Book by Amanda Mansell

Page 85  Red Orbit Necklace (left)
by Harriete Estel Berman, (right) by
Dougehum Lee titled Draw

The amount of effort involved to cut out the images must have been really challenging. Can you imagine cutting out all those fine lines in my work?  RedID_7_600 I've included my original photo (below) just so you can see the comparison. I think they did a fabulous job on the shadows. They don't look fake.

I can see real advantages to the white background. What do you think?

Adorn136Adorn137
Adorn © 2008 by Amanda Mansell Page 136-137. Left: Kiroki Iwata, Wishes of leaves & Expression of Plants. Left Center Andrea Wagner, House with a White Picket Fence. Center Top Right:Castello Hansen, Untitled. Far Right: Lucy Sarneel, Untitled. Right Center Bottom: Lesley Strickland, Metal.


Previous posts in the series Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos::
Side by Side Photos - Website Backgrounds Should be Consistent

Side by Side Photos -Clean or Complex Backgrounds?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons - Backgrounds with Texture or Pattern?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons: Colorful or Discordant?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos: Black Hole or Super Sophisticated?

Side by side comparisons of different photos - the graduated background. Stunning or stupefying?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos - the white background. Trendy or Technique?

Are You Being Judged by the Style of Your Images?


The photographers are revealed!


Side by Side Photos - Website Backgrounds Should be Consistent

When showing a group of photos, be sure the backgrounds are consistent. Practically speaking, if the backgrounds and/or photographic style changes from photo to photo on your web site or portfolio (or even in a juried application), it does NOT look good.

Anthrocabinetcur I recently studied a variety of web sites a few weeks ago for example photos.

For this post, let's look at the Anthropologie "Cabinet of Curiosities page (shown to the left) since they have a wide range of small scale 3 dimensional items. In the first example, the photographic images have an eclectic, stylized appearance, but notice that every photo has the the same background of bleached, faded wood. The web site works to pull the photos together as a group with identical backgrounds.

Anthrolanding While the landing page for each category may be eclectic or have a stylized background, move to any other page of inventory on the Anthropologie web site and you will see that every item is photographed on the same background. While not a solid color, it has a very Anthropurse muted, soft pattern. The background does not distract from the work. Each item is isolated.  None of the photos confuse the customer with earrings hanging off of teacups, necklaces draped over plates, or pendants pinned on wrinkled fabric.

Each and every photo conforms to the general style of the web site and clearly portrays the work.  The photo portfolio creates a clear identity for the business with a consistent style.

Artists and craftspeople can learn a lot from major retailer web sites and their professional merchandising schemes.  Keep backgrounds and the style of photography consistent. Applications for shows, submissions to juried opportunities, or even the appearance of a web site or online marketing should look like one cohesive identity with clear emphasis on the work.

Cratefireplace Go to any retail web site, from Tiffany to Crate and Barrel.  While they may have initial landing pages with multiple items offering mood, "warmth" or connection with their customer, when it comes to showing the merchandise, they don't confuse the customer.

CrateRusticBotanicalScreenLLF7  

 

Each item is shown without additional mood or clutter. Clarity about what they are "selling" is a top priority.

The same principle should apply for artists and makers. Mood, "warmth" and connection with your customer should be separated from representation of the item.

I am not saying that you must adopt the retailers' style completely. What I am asking is ....... Have you separated your merchandising from the photographic representation of your work? Do your backgrounds present a cohesive body of work?

Stay tuned to see more backgrounds issues!  Are there ways to break the rules of the graduated background with style and perfection?

Harriete

anthropologie

Previous posts in the series Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos:

Side by Side Photos -Clean or Complex Backgrounds?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons - Backgrounds with Texture or Pattern?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons: Colorful or Discordant?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos: Black Hole or Super Sophisticated?

Side by side comparisons of different photos - the graduated background. Stunning or stupefying?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos - the white background. Trendy or Technique?

Are You Being Judged by the Style of Your Images?


The photographers are revealed!


Side by Side Photos -Clean or Complex Backgrounds?

JEWELRYeclecticBackgrounds with additional items or content are said by advocates to be more interesting, offering mood, style, warmth or appeal to the viewer and potential customers. In the photo to the right, the jewelry is displayed on a marble table with a jar, shell dish, and other objects all in a warm brown color group. The photo was scanned from a recent Departures magazine.

As a photograph it is very well done. The exposure is balanced with no strong highlights or dark shadows obscuring the work. Focus at all levels and distances throughout the focal plain is perfect. The circular arc of the table is a very effective device for framing the work.  So, is this a good photo to represent the work?  Does the viewer know where to focus attention?  Is this photo appropriate for all situations?  

BluePearls This is a really important aspect to consider.  A number of artists and makers are showing their work with similarly styled backgrounds and groupings.  This may draw a particular audience in a particular scenario, but is it an effective representation of the work?

Photos like these are an editorial style. They can be used effectively in certain situations. 
JEWELRYgridThe style of these photos adds information that shifts the viewer's evaluation of the work.  The image in its entirety establishes a narrative that may detract from or obfuscate the work. The photo now demonstrates the creativity of the stylist and the photographer as much or more than the work of the maker.

Hotbutton If you submitted any one of these photos to a jury for a book or retail craft show (as just two examples), the risk of REJECTION is significantly elevated. The photos are not a clear and accurate representation of your work.

A juror wants to see the art or craft clearly without editorial or extraneous styling.  A photo for a jury evaluation should fill the frame without complex backgrounds, marble texture, waterwashed stones, grids, any other distraction.

Jurors typically must make snap decisions.  Don't give them any superficial reason to pass you over.  There is just too much competition.

What do you think?  Do you take photos like this? What is your intent? Are complex photo backgrounds effective merchandizing? Do they accurately represent the work? Are you consciously selecting your backgrounds to reach different audiences?

Harriete   

Previous posts in the series Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos:
Side by Side Photo Comparisons - Backgrounds with Texture or Pattern?

Side by Side Photo Comparisons: Colorful or Discordant?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos: Black Hole or Super Sophisticated?

Side by side comparisons of different photos - the graduated background. Stunning or stupefying?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos - the white background. Trendy or Technique?

Are You Being Judged by the Style of Your Images?


The photographers are revealed!

More posts in the series are coming....including images on your web site, and "breaking all the rules with style and perfection." 


Side by Side Photo Comparisons - Backgrounds with Texture or Pattern?

Over the last few weeks we have discussed art and craft photography and some of the tried and tested variables. The current arguments consider the impact of the "standard" graduated background or going for a bolder statement in the photograph with non-standard backgrounds.

PurplePURPLEbackground Today's post discusses backgrounds with texture or pattern. To avoid offending any particular artist or maker by selecting their photo for critique, I searched for example images of colored backgrounds with texture and pattern in high end magazines.

This purple background with a contrasting reflection of "leatherette texture" came from a recent Departures magazine. Obviously the photographer and jewelry manufacturer thought this was a great photo that effectively showcases the pendant.

The photo is excellent. The pendant is properly exposed without strong highlights to wash out the color. There is just a hint of glimmer to let you know the enamel and metal is shiny and smooth. A little darkness below the pendant gives it a strong foundation. It does not float but clearly lays on the fabric.

Now consider the purple colored background with a textured appearance. This textured background is no different than using felt, wrinkled fabric, stones, leaves, or wood. The background is something the photographer choose carefully to complement the pendant. But will the viewing audience like or dislike it?

The background material certainly adds a significant element to the photo.  The viewer is driven to consider the background in addition to the the work. Is it a distraction? Is this a fabulous photo,  or too much personality detracting from the work?  When your photos include a patterned or textured background, will people judge your background before the work when they have 2 seconds to look at the image?

Redclutter background The next photo uses a brilliant red background with a thematic element that echos the diamond pendant. In this case, it is a Cartier flower pendent with similar flowers in the red background. The general parallel would be photo backgrounds consisting of water scenes, moss, stones, grainy wood, or leaves -- any background that adds information. Is this added information an enhancement or a distraction? You may like it, others may not.  Regardless, the background is now part of the like or dislike assessment.

A thematic background may be well done, but is it appropriate to art and craft photography. Step back and ask yourself: Is the background essential to the presentation of the work AND TO AUDIENCE?   What is this photo going to look like during a juried review or on a web site with 20 other photos?  

Examine the red photo more carefully.  One may wonder what an expensive diamond pendant has to do with tropical orchids besides the form.  As a marketing device, perhaps it is trying to sell a lifestyle in which the work is promoted as a signature accessory.  Or like car commercials that show us the lifestyle of "wind in the hair" or driving fast like a "professional driver on a closed course."  "Do not attempt at home."  Maybe the lifestyle sells better than the work. The addition of the word and brand name Cartier to the photo is a "marketing device" that I think artists and makers should avoid. 

 Artists and makers have been trying all varieties of colors, patterns and textures to add warmth, style, or other desirable dimensions to their photos.  In whatever form, it adds information to the photo.  Is it a distraction? What message does the background say about the work?  Does the background help sell the work? Will your background be judged instead of the work? Does a background pigeonhole your work into a specific context? Is that where you want to be?


Does the background become overly dramatic, maybe even looking more like a  fashion magazine ad than a serious piece of art jewelry? Is there a prejudice toward colored backgrounds because the colored background is not serious enough? Is the colored background colorful or disconnected to the more serious conceptual content behind this art jewelry?

Previous posts in the series Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos:

Side by Side Photo Comparisons: Colorful or Discordant?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos: Black Hole or Super Sophisticated?

Side by side comparisons of different photos - the graduated background. Stunning or stupefying?

Side by Side Comparisons of Different Photos - the white background. Trendy or Technique?

Are You Being Judged by the Style of Your Images?


The photographers are revealed!

More posts in the series are coming....