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Use Your Camera As An Impartial Opinion - A Third Eye

I've been working really hard for the last three months on a major piece. The deadline is looming, I can't take a day off to look at my work with a fresh eye. This is a real concern.

TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel Berman
TuBishvat Seder Plate in progress. View every step from the past 2 1/2 months on Flickr.

emiko oye and Aryn  Shelander work on the TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel BermanLeaves7457.72800Sometimes, I am lucky enough to have my husband, children or studio assistant offer their opinions. Thank goodness!

 

An impartial opinion and a fresh set of eyes are absolutely essential.

emiko oye and Aryn Shelander working on the TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel BermanAryncloseleaves72.800.7462
emiko oye and Aryn Shelander working together to fine tune the images in tin.

But all too often, like last night, I am by myself making really important decisions with no one to offer an impartial opinion, a third eye. After hours and hours of working each day, I am running into decision fatigue and can no longer see my work objectively. Does this ever happen to you?

It's a real problem -- the brain compensates by filling in less than perfect information. How can I find out if my next solution is "working" visually? How can an artist see their work with a fresh eye when there is no time to take a break?

TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel Berman TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel Berman

Here's one solution:

USE YOUR CAMERA FOR AN IMPARTIAL OPINION
A few quick photos in the studio can really help you see your work in a new way.


TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel BermanTuBishvat Seder plate without leaves at the top of the apple.

Take out your digital camera and take a few photos.

Upload to your computer and evaluate the images.

Here is an example.  Compare two possibilities.

TuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel BermanTuBishvat seder plate in progress by Harriete Estel Berman

The left image has three leaves on the top of the apple. The right image has one leaf over the top of the apple.  Which do you like better?

The photos can help you see your work in a whole new way. 

Next time you're "stuck" trying to make a decision, take a few photos.  Or, . . . another person I know scans her work on her scanner.  Either way, capture an impartial opinion - a third eye and a fresh perspective on your work.

It really works!

Harriete

Next Post: Planning the best possible photographic images of your work.

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