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Photography in Flux - 3 Photographers Offer Tips and Tricks for Quality Photos

BlueSpiralGraph.grDoug Yaple, Christopher Conrad and Roger Schreiber all offered solid information with tips and tricks for producing quality photographic images of art and craft. Now EVERYONE can benefit by watching and listening to the same PowerPoint presentation given at the 2011 Professional Development Seminar during the SNAG Conference in Seattle.

Photolights Here are a couple of highlights from the photographers commentary followed immediately by the SlideShare presentation. "Learn how the visual language of photography can represent your work most effectively."

Doug Yaple.goblets
  Photo by Doug Yaple of glass goblets
  with a more "classical" approach to the
  background.

QUOTES from DOUG YAPLE:

"The market and the audience should drive the decisions in how to photograph your work."

Ask yourself, "What is the image to be used for? Online advertising, articles in print, cover shots, jury submission?"

"Make the story come out in your photos."

Doug Yaple was very articulate in describing his photographic images and why they are so effective. Listen to the Photography in Flux presentation and learn.

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ConradJewelry Final 6x4
Photos by photographer Christopher Conrad

QUOTES from CHRISTOPHER CONRAD:

TIP 1. WORK WITH GOOD LIGHT
Be careful about colored walls and mixed lighting sources when photographing your work.

TIP 2. USE TOOLS TO SHAPE AND MODIFY THE LIGHT
He makes a couple of suggestions for bouncing light into the photographic image.

TIP 3. BUILD A SOFT BOX FOR DIRECT SUNLIGHT.
Conrad tells how.

TIP 4. USE A TRIPOD
Did you know that a "lower ISO reduces noise"? I didn't.

TIP 5. A TRICK FOR SHOOTING PAINTINGS, QUILTS OR LARGE FLAT GEOMETRIC OBJECTS. It's so simple! Listen to Photography in Flux and learn. 

 

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Roger Schreiber photo of work by Carol Gouthro
Close up photographic image by Roger
Schreiber of ceramic by Carol Gouthro

Photographer ROGER SCHREIBER says ask yourself:
"Who is your audience?"
"Do you have enough time?"

 

He continues: "Everything that falls within the frame is part of the photograph. Shadows, highlights and background are all part of the picture." He is so right. When looking at something in person, the human eye has a natural tendency to edit. The photographic image is another thing entirely. Everything has equal importance in the flattened picture frame. This makes even the tiniest flaw look like a major distraction. Here is an interesting article about the Camera vs. The Human Eye.

 

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